The Perfect 1%

In order to achieve your maximum potential you have to take it one step at a time. Each Training Plan, every training cycle and every workout MUST have a goal. When you achieve that goal, you have reached a new level in training and then you have to go and seek another goal; this is the one percent. Increasing your efforts, with a positive attitude allows you to achieve that one percent. Our guest coaches made up of professionals around the world provide tips for the everyday athlete that can help maximize that very effort of achieving The Perfect 1%.

Tammy Whyte, B.S. in Exercise Science

"Feeling burnt out? Whether it’s from the stresses of the world or constantly going hard in training without a break, burn out can hit us all. And without races, those natural ends to training cycles aren't really there for many of us, which can mean we start to feel burnt out [mentally and/or physically] if we never give ourselves those breaks.

If you're feeling this way, here are a few ideas to help you get out of that slump and feel good about running again:

  1. Take a few weeks off running. Yes, it's okay and it's GOOD to take 1-2 weeks completely off running. I usually do this a few times/year.

  2. Cut down on how many days you're running. If you're running 4 days, try 3. If you're running 5 days, try 4 and see how that feels.

  3. Add in other activities. Taking time off or cutting down doesn't mean you're sitting on your couch for more time [unless you're injured or need more rest]. Try a new class. Go somewhere for a long hike. Take a long walk. Do the strength training you said you were gonna do but haven't started doing yet 😉

  4. Change your perspective. Remember, you don't HAVE to run, you GET to run. Take the pressure off yourself and be grateful for the opportunity to move your body. It's a small shift that can make a big difference."

Tammy Whyte, TW Training and Wellness, Chicago, IL

*Certifications & Special Training*

B.S. in Exercise Science from University of Michigan, Road Runners Club of America (RRCA) Certified Coach, National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) Certified Personal Trainer

Check out Tammy's "Perfect 1%" video here. You can also connect with Tammy through www.twtrainingwellness.com, or on Instagram.

Check out Lloyd's "Perfect 1%" video here. You can also connect with Lloyd through OnPointFitness.com

Lloyd Henry, M.S. in Medical Science, MBA

Proper run form goes a long way in reducing your risk of injury and making you more efficient. Two things to focus on are head position and foot placement. Look forward and keep the head in a neutral position. Avoid dropping your chin and looking down because that may cause you to slouch which can reduce you lung capacity. Try to get your feet to land under you to support your weight as you run. Avoid over striding where the leg swings in front resulting in a heel strike.

Lloyd Henry, OnPoint Fitness Coach, Washington, DC

*Certifications & Special Training*

Certified ChiRunning Instructor, Certified ChiWalking Instructor, Certified Total Immersion Swim Coach, Certified USA Cycling Level 3 Coach, Certified USA Triathlon Race Director, Red Cross Water Safety Instructor, Red Cross First Aid & CPR Instructor, Red Cross Lifeguard Instructor

C. Wallace Hume, NASM Certified Personal Trainer

"Here is my secret formula for getting your first pull up! Perform all of these exercises in your pull up workout. At first you may not be able to do the some of them. Keep practicing and each week you will improve!

  1. Scapular pull up. Start in a dead hang position with your feet extended, but not touching the ground. This is called a passive hang. Move from a passive hang to an active hang by depressing and retracting your shoulder blades, keeping your arms straight and pulling and holding for a few seconds, then relax. Use only your scapula to pull you off the ground. Think of your hands as just hooks holding you onto the bar. If you cannot do this, use a band for assistance. This move is critical for all calisthenic pulling moves! Do not move past this step until you have mastered it! Perform 6-8 reps for 3-4 sets.

  2. Eccentric pull up - Perform a slight jump to start out with your chin above the bar. If the bar is still too high, stand on a box or some other sturdy object. Slowly lower your body down with control. Maintain a hollow body position and keep everything tight! Aim for a 10 second lowering time. Perform this exercise 5-8 times.

  3. Static Hold - Again, using a jump or a box - start with your chin above the bar and hold. Make sure to maintain a good hollow body position with all of your muscles tight. Concentrate on keeping your scapular down and back and your arms out to the side, not drawn in towards your chest. Aim for a 10 second hold. Perform this exercise for 4-6 reps, 3-4 sets.

  4. Band Assisted Pull Up - Use a resistance band and wrap it around the pull up bar. Be sure to use enough resistance to complete a full range motion, but not so much that the band is acting as a trampoline and helping too much! If you only have 2 bands and both of them are not enough "help" for you, use them both together. As you progress, remove the lighter band, then replace the heavier band with the lighter band. Perform 6-8 reps for 3-4 sets.

  • Practice pull ups 2-3 times per week to see fast progression."

C. Wallace Hume, Tomboy Lifestyle (Fitness) - Miami Beach, FL

Check out C. Wallace's "Perfect 1%" video here. You can also connect with C. Wallace on Instagram.

Check out Micah's "Perfect 1%" video here. You can also connect with Micah by email, or Instagram.

Dr. Micah Wells, PT, DPT, CMTPT

“Within the athletic realm, we tend to primarily focus on bigger joints of the body (i.e. hips) and neglect smaller joints (like the ankle). Ankle mobility is essential for each and every athlete! This video is a demonstration of improving ankle mobility in order to enhance your overall performance. Start with the rocking motion 20 times with 2-3 second holds each rep. Seek medical advice prior to performing for safety purposes.

Being The Perfect Athlete means allowing your weaknesses to become your strengths in order to become elite at your perspective sport.“

Dr. Micah A. Wells, PT, DPT, CMTPT, The Micah Touch™ - Washington, DC

Greg Cephas, NPTI Certified Trainer, Crossfit L1 Trainer

"Kettle Swings is an important strength training exercise that helps develop and strengthen muscles for your posterior chain (hamstrings , glutes, and lower back) which are muscles that propel us forward. For triathletes, it's important to develop a strong posterior chain so that we can be stronger and more efficient in all three disciplines of triathlon. While doing kettlebell swings it's important that we keep a flat back and a soft bend in the knees to ensure proper form and to avoid injury. Also while performing this movement it is important that we shoot our hips through and not pull the weight with our arms while keeping our feet planted to the group to avoid rocking.

Example Workout: 5 sets of 10 KB Swings, followed by 50 Jump Rope... REPEAT!"

Greg Cephas, The Basement Fitness - Claymont, DE

Check out Greg's "Perfect 1%" video here. You can also connect with Greg by email, or on Instagram.

Check out Briana's "Perfect 1%" video here. You can also connect with Briana by email, or on Instagram.

Dr. Briana Hurt, PT, DPT

"Mobility is something that is often neglected by athletes. Even spending just 5 to 10 minutes a day can improve how you feel and move. We spend a lot of our days sitting so it’s important to take some time to move in the opposite position. This exercise is a good way to open up the front of your hips and add in a little upper body and thoracic mobility. Try it out and let me know how it goes!”

Briana Hurt, Rose Physical Therapy - Washington, DC